Polish civilians, including a Catholic priest, are held as hostages awaiting execution by Wehrmacht soldiers following Bloody Sunday

Polish civilians, including a Catholic priest, are held as hostages awaiting execution by Wehrmacht soldiers following Bloody Sunday (German: Bromberger Blutsonntag); a series of killings of members of the German ethnic minority that took place on 3 September 1939, two days after the beginning of the German invasion of Poland, in and around the city of Bydgoszcz. According to a British witness, a retreating Polish artillery unit was shot at by German saboteurs and ethnic German civilians from within a house; the Poles returned fire and were subsequently shot at from a church. In the ensuing fight both sides suffered casualties; captured German nonuniformed armed insurgents were executed on the spot and some were lynched by mobs. The killings were followed by swift German reprisals. A number of Polish civilians were executed by German military units of the Einsatzgruppen, Waffen-SS, and Wehrmacht. By 8 September 1939, between 200 to 400 Polish civilians had been killed. 876 Poles were tried by German tribunal for involvement in the events of Bloody Sunday before the end of 1939. 87 men and 13 women were sentenced without the right to appeal. Bydgoszcz, Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland. September 1939.

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